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Jared’s Graduation in Uganda

Jared’s Graduation in Uganda

Here is the result of one woman’s amazing generosity: Jared Opio, a Ugandan student of Public Health graduated in December 2015!  If you have been following us for a few years, you might remember Jared’s initial request that I posted on this blog at the end of 2012.  He was looking for a sponsor so he could transform his life by gaining a university education.  Bev answered his request and, after three years, Jared invited us all to his graduation in Kampala.

Road trip!  We packed up two of Francis’ kids, Mathew and Miriam, and the four of us headed west.  We were only ten minutes on the road when a crazy bus caused our first halt.  It was passing us on the verge and was rocking wildly as it fell in and out of holes until one lurch made the bus rock so far as to bump us and shatter a  back window!  Fortunately no one was sitting there, but I was furious.  Kenyan buses think they are kings of the road and have little regard for other users, just as long as they can get where they are going as quickly as possible.  It seems they had caused such damage before however, as the conductor gave some cash to Francis and they continued their journey.  When we found somewhere later in the day to replace the window, we found the amount he had given us was exactly right!

The rest of the trip to Kampala was event-free.  We spent a night at Lelin Camp near Iten overlooking the Kerio Valley.  The training centre for Kenyan athletes is at Iten and indeed as we drove through early the next morning we saw several running along the mountain roads.

We arrived a day early and so we spent the day catching up with Jared.  We were pleasantly surprised when he handed us gifts – OTA t-shirts!!  He had got our logo from the internet and had it embroidered on shirts for Francis and I.  This is something we had been talking about doing for years now, and here Jared had shown us up!  We are immensely grateful for the shirts and wear them with pride.

In the evening, we went to see the Ndere Troupe, a dancing and drumming show.  The host was very entertaining and one of his sets involved getting an American member of the audience to demonstrate to the Ugandans how all the vowels actually have different pronunciations.  He used the examples “hat”, “hut”, ‘hurt” and “hot” which can all sound very similar when a Ugandan (or a Kenyan) say them.  Similarly, I’m never quite sure if Francis is asking me if I’m “hungry” or “angry” and the evolution of “hangry” in English has made things a bit easier for both of us.

The Burundian drummers had to be the highlight however.  Their drums were massive and so the logical place to carry huge drums is of course on one’s head.  They walked onto the stage beating the drums that sat horizontally on their heads.  They then lowered the drums to the ground and you could tell how heavy they were from the way they heaved them down.  It was incredible!

Graduation Day

The next day was the graduation.  Unfortunately, Bev had fallen ill a week before she was due to travel and so I was even more anxious to be there to report back to her about it.  But when I arrived at the gate they told me I wasn’t allowed to bring my camera inside.  It was very confusing – this is a big day for families to see their loved ones graduate from university and we can’t bring cameras in?!  Meanwhile, everyone inside was taking photos with their phones and iPads!  I’m still not sure about the reason for banning cameras but we got around the situation and I was able to attend.

Jared was beaming with pride in his cloak and hat amongst his fellow students.  The Bachelors of Public Health were the second biggest group after the Nursing graduates and they let out a loud whoop once all their names had been called.  The restrictions of the space meant that the students just stood up when their name was called rather than negotiating their way to the front to doff and shake hands.  It was a much more efficient way to do it and the ceremony finished a bit early as a result.

Jared and his aunt invited us to lunch afterwards where we ate some delicious food and took photos in the garden….in between downpours!  It was a short but sweet visit as the next day we headed back to Kenya.  We are very proud of Jared’s achievement and of course we thank Bev so very much for affording him this opportunity.  Jared has since secured employment in his field, working in refugee camps on the Uganda-South Sudan border administering vaccinations and improving maternal and child health.

Kenya’s Madaraka Day

Kenya’s Madaraka Day

On 1st June each year, Kenya celebrates Madaraka Day, a day which commemorates the beginning of Kenya’s self-governance.  “Madaraka” is a Kiswahili word meaning “responsibility” and 1st June signifies the day the British colonial rulers handed over the responsibility for governing Kenya to the Kenyan people.

Throughout most of the 1950s, the Mau Maus had been fighting in Kenya’s central highlands against British rule.  Tens of thousands of Kenyans had died during the struggle with the British suffering relatively low losses.  However, the rebellions led to increased political involvement being granted to Kenyans and eventually, on 1 June 1963, the British handed over the reins to the Kenyan African National Union (KANU) and its leader, Jomo Kenyatta, became Kenya’s first Prime Minister.

Although Kenya now had internal self-rule, it was not yet fully independent from the colonial power.  So Madaraka Day is not the same as Kenya’s Independence Day – that is celebrated in December.  Independence came six months after Madaraka on 12 December 1963.  Another year later Kenya became a Republic and Kenyatta’s title was elevated to President of the Republic of Kenya.

Nowadays, Madaraka Day is one of Kenya’s big celebrations.  The main event is the President’s address at Nyayo Stadium along with singers and dancers from all over the country performing traditional songs.

In 2013, Kenya celebrated its Jubilee – 50 years of independence.  There were mixed reactions from the population about Kenya’s progress over the past 50 years and as a foreigner living in Kenya, it was very interesting to hear the comments.  Some people said that with the high levels of corruption in the government, Kenya has not progressed at all since independence, while others were positive about Kenya’s development and simply enjoying the fact that they had been free from the colonial power for 50 years.

Madaraka Day Safaris

Madaraka Day is a public holiday in Kenya and usually marked by a long weekend that gives Kenyans a chance to travel.  It is at the tail-end of the rainy season as well, giving Kenyans all the more reason to get out of town and enjoy a holiday.  Rhino Charge, an incredible 4×4 rally in isolated bushland, is held on Madaraka Day weekend each year.  Even for non-competitors it is a fun event: camping out, watching some amazing driving feats, and enjoying the party each night.  In 2015, the Lake Turkana Cultural Festival was also held on the Madaraka Day weekend, but it is not yet confirmed whether it will remain on these dates next year.

Rhino Charge, an incredible 4x4 rally in isolated bushland, is held on Madaraka Day weekend each year

Rhino Charge, an incredible 4×4 rally in isolated bushland, is held on Madaraka Day weekend each year

Kenyans definitely know how to celebrate their public holidays so as you are planning your safari, have a look at the calendar and try planning it around one of these events.  Or you can contact us (tracey@ota-responsibletravel.com) and we can give you some ideas of holidays and festivals you might enjoy in Kenya throughout the year.

Four Brilliant Ideas for a Kenyan Long Weekend

Four Brilliant Ideas for a Kenyan Long Weekend

Easter holidays, Eid, May Day, Kenyatta Day – there are plenty of long weekends throughout the year and if you live in Nairobi you might be wondering how to spend a four-day weekend.  This article will give you four ideas of how to spend a long weekend and explore Kenya beyond Nairobi’s city limits.

1. Lumo and Amboseli

Lumo Community Wildlife Sanctuary lies adjacent to Tsavo West National Park and offers stunning sunset views of Mt Kilimanjaro.  It’s about a seven-hour drive from Nairobi so you can arrive in time for a late afternoon game drive on your way to your accommodation.  The next day, spend the full day searching for leopards around the rocky outcrops and wonder at the red elephants that inhabit the sanctuary.  The shy Lesser Kudu is prevalent and many birds can be seen.  Depart early the following morning for Amboseli National Park where you can again enjoy a late afternoon game drive to your accommodation in the middle of the park.  Wake up to sunrise views of Mt Kilimanjaro as you head out for a morning game drive before making your way back to Nairobi.  Alternatively you could swap Lumo for Tsavo West.

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2. Maasai Mara and Lake Nakuru

Depart Nairobi early for the famous Maasai Mara, where you can go for an afternoon game drive after lunch.  Spend the whole next day game driving including a visit to the hippo pool and seeking out the lions that became famous through the BBC’s Big Cat Diary.  There are opportunities to go for a hot air balloon flight at dawn, visit a Maasai village or walk with the Maasai up to the escarpment for stunning views over the reserve.  On the third day drive to Lake Nakuru National Park, where you can find accommodation inside the park.  Evening and morning game drives provide opportunities to see rhinos and Rothschild giraffes before returning to Nairobi.  This itinerary could be just as enjoyable going to Nakuru first and then to Maasai Mara.

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3. Lake Naivasha and Maasai Mara
It’s a short two-hour drive to Lake Naivasha leaving you most of the day to enjoy the activities available there. You might want to cycle through Hell’s Gate National Park, hike up Mt Longonot or take a boat ride on the lake. Early the next morning you might opt to go for a walking safari at Green Crater Lake or Wileli Conservancy before heading to the Maasai Mara.  An afternoon game drive can be enjoyed, followed by a full day in the park the next day.  Before heading back to Nairobi on the last day, there is time for a final morning game drive and perhaps a visit to the neighbouring Maasai village.  Again, this itinerary could be done in reverse – heading to Maasai Mara for two nights first and then enjoying the final night at Lake Naivasha and doing the activities on the day you return to Nairobi.

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4. Lake Magadi

If you are interested in heading off the beaten track a bit and not spending so many hours driving from place to place, Lake Magadi and the surrounding area offer a different experience.  This is also a fantastic trip to see the migratory birds that visit Kenya at this time of year.  On the way you can hike Ngong Hills, stop at Olepolos for lunch and then stay at the Olorgesailie Pre-Historic Site for the first night.  The next day continue to Magadi town and into the Lake Magadi Conservation Area where you set up camp for the second night.  The hot springs are very hot if you are brave enough for a swim, otherwise you can take a walk, do some bird watching or just chill out.  From Lake Magadi head to the cooler Nguruman Escarpment where you can camp not far from the town at a campsite in the wildlife corridor between Maasai Mara and Amboseli.  In the morning go for a walk with the camp staff to see the wildlife and birds of the area before driving back to Nairobi.

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On the first three trips, there are options to stay in lodges or to camp, while the Lake Magadi trip is camping only.  You are welcome to contact OTA to discuss your weekend plans further.

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